Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class wpdb in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 52

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/cache.php on line 36

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Object_Cache in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/cache.php on line 389

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 537

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 537

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 537

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 537

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_PageDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 556

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 653

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 653

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 653

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 653

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_CategoryDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el($output) in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/classes.php on line 678

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/query.php on line 21

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-includes/theme.php on line 508

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/ambaguin/public_html/fr/wp-content/plugins/hello.php on line 305
Le président Obama reçoit à la Maison Blanche les présidents Alpha Condé (Guinée), Mahamadou Issoufou (Niger), Boni Yayi (Bénin) et Alassane Ouattara (Côte d’Ivoire) | Ambassade de Guinée au Canada

Le président Obama reçoit à la Maison Blanche les présidents Alpha Condé (Guinée), Mahamadou Issoufou (Niger), Boni Yayi (Bénin) et Alassane Ouattara (Côte d’Ivoire)

Obama Conde

Le président Barack Obama a promis vendredi que les Etats-Unis resteraient des “partenaires inconditionnels” des démocraties africaines, en recevant chaleureusement à la Maison Blanche quatre dirigeants d’Afrique noire francophone.

July 29, 2011, The White House : Remarks of President Obama After Meeting with African Heads of State

Voir vidéo de la rencontre

The White House : Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release
July 29, 2011
Remarks of President Obama After Meeting with African Heads of State
Cabinet Room, 4:13 P.M. EDT

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Well, I just wanted to publicly welcome four very distinguished leaders to the White House: President Yayi of Benin; President Conde of Guinea; President Issoufou of Niger; and President Ouattara of Côte d’Ivoire.

Although, obviously, we’ve got a lot of things going here in Washington today, it was important for us I think to maintain this scheduled appointment with four leaders of nations that represent Africa’s democratic progress, which is vital to a stable and prosperous and just Africa, but is also critical to the stability and prosperity of the world.

All these leaders were elected through free and fair elections. They’ve shown extraordinary persistence in wanting to promote democracy in their countries despite significant risks to their own personal safety and

despite enormous challenges, in some cases — most recently in Côte d’Ivoire — in actually implementing the results of these elections.

But because of their fortitude and because of the determination of their people to live in democratic, free societies, they have been able to arrive at a position of power that is supported by the legitimate will of their peoples. And as such, they can serve as effective models for the continent.

These countries all underscore what I emphasized when I visited Ghana and gave a speech about Africa as a whole — this is a moment of great opportunity and significant progress in Africa. Politically, the majority of Sub-Saharan African countries are now embracing democracy. Economically, Africa is one of the fastest-growing regions in the world.

And we just had a very productive discussion where we discussed how we can build on both the political progress, the economic progress, and address the security challenges that can continue to confront Africa. And I emphasized that the United States has been and will continue to be a stalwart partner with them in this process of democratization and development.

Despite the impressive work of all these gentlemen, I’ve said before and I think they all agree, Africa does not need strong men; Africa needs strong institutions. So we are working with them as partners to build effective judiciaries, strong civil societies, legislatures that are effective and inclusive, making sure that human rights are protected.

With respect to economic development, all of us agree that we can’t keep on duplicating a approach that breeds dependence, but rather we need to embrace an approach that creates sustainability and capacity within each of these countries, through trade and investment and the development of human capital and the education of young people throughout these countries.

We discussed as well that not only do we want to encourage trade between the United States and each of these respective countries but we want to encourage inter-African and regional trade, and that requires investments in infrastructure in those areas.

We are partners in resolving conflicts peacefully and have worked effectively with ECOWAS and the African Union to resolve crises in the region. And we appreciate very much the assistance that we’ve received on battling terrorism that currently is trying to gain a foothold inside of Africa.

And, finally, we discussed how we can partner together to avert the looming humanitarian crisis in eastern Africa. I think it hasn’t gotten as much attention here in the United States as it deserves. But we’re starting to see famine developing along the Horn of Africa, in areas like Somalia in particular. And that’s going to require an international response, and Africa will have to be a partner in making sure that tens of thousands of people do not starve to death.

So let me just close by saying that many of the countries here are — either have celebrated or are in the process of celebrating their 50th year of independence. As President Issoufou pointed out, I’m also celebrating my 50th of at least existence. (Laughter.)

And when we think about the extraordinary progress that’s been made, I think there’s much we can be proud of. But of course, when we think about the last 50 years, we also have to recognize there have been a lot of opportunities missed. And so, these leaders I think are absolutely committed to making sure that 50 years from now they can say that they helped to turn the tide in their countries, to establish strong, democratic practices, to help establish economic prosperity and security.

And we just want you to know the United States will stand with you every step of the way.

Thank you very much, everyone. (Applause.)
END 4:24 P.M. EDT

 

Obama promet un partenariat “inconditionnel” aux démocraties africaines

Le président Barack Obama a promis vendredi que les Etats-Unis resteraient des “partenaires inconditionnels” des démocraties africaines, en recevant chaleureusement à la Maison Blanche quatre dirigeants d’Afrique noire francophone.

M. Obama, qui accueillait les présidents béninois Boni Yayi, guinéen Alpha Condé, nigérien Mahamadou Issoufou et ivoirien Alassane Ouattara, a en outre remarqué, pour les saluer, que tous quatre avaient été portés au pouvoir lors de consultations transparentes et démocratiques. “Tous ces dirigeants ont été élus lors d’élections libres et justes. Ils ont fait preuve d’une persistance extraordinaire (…) malgré des risques importants pour leur propre sécurité, et malgré d’immenses difficultés, le plus récemment en Côte d’Ivoire”, a remarqué M. Obama, à l’issue d’une réunion d’une heure. Les Etats-Unis avaient soutenu sans réserve M. Ouattara à l’issue de l’élection présidentielle de fin novembre 2010, et exhorté le président sortant Laurent Gbagbo à quitter le pouvoir. M. Obama avait salué l’arrestation de M. Gbagbo en avril et appelé à faire en sorte que les auteurs de violences post-électorales répondent de leurs actes.

Evoquant ses hôtes, M. Obama a estimé qu’”ils sont arrivés au pouvoir en étant soutenus par la volonté légitime de leurs peuples, et en tant que tels, ils peuvent servir de modèle au continent tout entier”. “Une majorité de pays en Afrique subsaharienne embrassent maintenant la démocratie”, a noté le président américain, qui effectuait vendredi une rare incursion en politique étrangère au cours d’un mois qui l’aura surtout vu se consacrer au débat sur la dette avec le Congrès. “J’ai insisté sur le fait que les Etats-Unis avaient été et continueraient d’être des partenaires inconditionnels de (ces pays) dans ce processus de démocratisation et de développement”, a promis M. Obama.

Les dirigeants n’ont pas fait de déclaration à la presse à l’issue de la rencontre, dans la salle du Conseil de la Maison Blanche, attenante au Bureau ovale. M. Obama a aussi indiqué avoir évoqué avec eux la famine en Afrique de l’Est, et souhaité une “réponse internationale” pour l’enrayer. En Côte d’Ivoire, la presse proche de M. Ouattara, comme le journal Nord-Sud, avait salué à l’avance “une grande rencontre pour clore une visite historique” de M. Ouattara aux Etats-Unis, qui “augure d’un avenir radieux vu la pluie d’investissements qui s’annonce”.

M. Obama, né aux Etats-Unis d’un père kényan, ne s’est rendu qu’à une seule reprise en Afrique noire depuis le début de son mandat il y a deux ans et demi, au Ghana en juillet 2009. Il avait alors appelé le continent à prendre en main son propre destin et à combattre les pratiques antidémocratiques. Au Niger, la rencontre Obama-Issoufou a également soulevé l’enthousiasme. “Les Etats-Unis sont les champions de la démocratie; si un président est fréquentable pour eux, alors c’est synonyme d’un quitus à son engagement pour la démocratie”, a expliqué à l’AFP Iro Sani, porte-parole du parti au pouvoir.

“La communauté internationale jette aujourd’hui un regard positif sur le Niger après des élections libres et démocratiques en 2011″, a approuvé Ali Idrissa, acteur de la société civile. Mais c’est aussi “un regard intéressé” sur ce pays sahélien “au vu de son potentiel minier, notamment d’uranium et pétrole”, a-t-il remarqué. Deux dirigeants de pays africains riches en pétrole ont eu récemment les honneurs d’une réception par M. Obama: le Nigérian Goodluck Jonathan et le Gabonais Ali Bongo, début juin. Le dirigeant américain leur avait demandé de lutter contre la corruption. Source : AFP - Washington, 29 juillet 2011 21:47

Publié le Vendredi 29 juillet 2011 dans Revue de Presse
RSS 2.0 Commentaire | Trackback

Laisser un commentaire